The aim of this guide is to help you identify if you have grounds to appeal. It may help you to think about how what has happened to you may fit into one or more of the 3 grounds for appeal as defined by the University's Regulations Governing Academic Appeals (section 4.1, 4.2, 4.3). As life rarely fits neatly into one of three rules, the following questions may assist you.

What should I do if can’t get all the evidence?

Again, life rarely runs smoothly. We advise that you submit the best evidence available and explain as clearly as you are able if evidence is: missing / incomplete / late

Consider:

  • How does the new information relate to what has happened?
  • What paperwork can you provide to back it up?
  • Who is that paperwork from and is it from a source that is likely to be considered trustworthy?
  • Why are you presenting it now?

This is what has happened – is that how things are supposed to work?

The University has many rules, administrative procedures, processes and ways of assessing students. Some may apply to everyone, and some may depend on what you are studying and at which level. No one person knows them all, although we may be able to suggest a good place to look. We would suggest you check: Blackboard, Student Handbook, University Calendar, or University Quality Handbook.

Consider:

  • How does the failure relate to what has happened?
  • Which process or procedure was not followed (are you able to identify the procedure or regulation?)

Are the factors likely to give me the outcome I am requesting?

Advisers cannot predict the outcome, nor will we tell you whether or not you should appeal. What we ask is that you consider whether the factors you are raising differ from the ups and downs commonly experienced, what steps you took to let people know and who you have approached for help.

Consider:

  • What were the factors and how did they impact?
  • Is there evidence which you are able to submit?
  • Were the factors
    • Unexpected / on-going
    • Might they continue to have an impact?
    • How might you lessen their impact should they reoccur?
    • Were you able to tell anyone about them at the time?