The purpose of this guide is to give you a basic overview of the appeals process. As a student you can appeal against any academic decision made by the University (except for academic judgement, e.g. you think you deserve a higher mark). You can appeal providing you have grounds and evidence supporting them.

New Substantive Information

Consider: What is your new substantive information? How does it relate to what has happened? What evidence can you provide to back it up? Is this an isolated incident, or on-going? Why were you not able to provide this information prior to relevant body making its decision? What outcome are you seeking?

Failure in process, procedure or administrative error

Consider: Which formal process do you feel the School has not adhered to? Can you point to where this is written down in School or University Regulations/Handbook? How does this failure relate to what has happened? What outcome are you seeking?

Adversely Affected Performance

Consider: What factors affected your performance and how do they link to the decision you are appealing? What evidence can you provide to support your case? Why couldn’t you provide this information/alert someone (within the faculty) to this problem (by utilising the Special Considerations procedure, for example) prior to the relevant body making its decision? Was this an isolated incident, or is it on-going? If on-going, what steps can you take/support can you engage with, to ensure it has a reduced impact on your performance in the future?

How do I make an appeal?

You can appeal within 10 working days, or in the case of supplementary examinations 5 working days, of the date you received the decision. To start the process, you need to complete Stage 1 Notice to Appeal form located under Appendix A of the appeals regulations and send it to your faculty’s Curriculum & Quality Assurance Team.

You will be invited to a Preliminary Meeting (Stage 1 Appeals meeting), normally within 5 working days from sending the form. Make sure you prepare for the meeting by writing a statement, which will ensure you cover all aspects of your case and make your appeal strong.

You can find out further information about the Appeals Process here

Writing a statement to support your appeal

We have prepared a useful guide to help you write a statement. You can find it here.

Appeal support

As a student you have the right to seek independent advice and support regarding your appeal. As advisers we can help you prepare and make the most of your appeal. We can also go with you to the appeal meeting and support you throughout.

Action plan when appealing

  • Make an appointment with an Advice Centre adviser
  • Complete the Notice to Appeal Form and prepare relevant evidence
  • Meet with the adviser to go through your appeal, give you feedback for the appeals form and statement
  • Send the form and evidence to your faculty
  • Atend the Stage 1 meeting (notify the Advice Centre if you would like an adviser to attend with you)

After the Stage 1 appeal meeting

There can only be two outcomes of the first appeal meeting.

  • The faculty representative accepts your appeal and recommends a change to the original decision
  • The faculty representative decides that you didn’t demonstrate the grounds for appeal and makes a recommendation that you don’t proceed with submitting a formal appeal (Stage 2).

If the faculty recommends that you don’t go to formal appeal (Stage 2) because you lack grounds, you are still able to proceed to the formal stage of the appeals process.

Further guidance

For further guidance on the appeal regulations and the whole process, contact the Advice Centre.

You can also visit us in Building 40, Highfield campus. Our opening hours are Monday–Friday 09.00–17.00

If the faculty recommends that you don’t go to formal appeal (Stage 2) because you lack grounds, you are still able to proceed to the formal stage of the appeals process.